Culture

  • What the history of streetcars tells us

    I often see people commenting on photos of Winnipeg in the 20th century on social media. Many of these comments express yearning for a time when Winnipeg was a multi-modal city.

  • Arts briefs

    A dark day for the arts // A flurry of laughs // A dance double-feature // A concert in the sky(walk) // An intuitive art exhibition // A call for Prairie art books

  • Giving back by biting back

    Forty years ago, Pat Bruderer, known as Halfmoon Woman, met the late Angelique Merasty, a world-renowned birchbark biting artist, while working at a friendship centre in Thompson.

  • True crime is still true life

    A cacophony of sirens blares from rescue ve- hicles as they whip past a traffic clog. Drivers tense up and look around. What happened? Is it serious? Did someone die?

  • Horoscopes

    The new moon in Aquarius presents unique circumstances.

  • Aisha Alfa and cohorts return for Park Theatre party

    On Feb. 9, an eclectic group of comedians will take the stage to serve up belly laughs – with a Chubby Checker-style twist.

  • Black pride, no prejudice

    When Joseph Ahissou first moved to Canada from his home in the Republic of Benin, he became distinctly aware of a part of his identity for the first time.

  • Culturally appropriate care for Manitoba survivors

    The expansion of a forensic nursing program at two community clinics will help survivors of sexual assault and domestic violence access trauma-informed and culturally appropriate care.

  • Ushering a Yiddish renaissance

    Throughout its thousand-year history, Yiddish formed the linguistic foundation of a rich world of literature, music, folklore and fine arts.

  • Origin Stories: Kale Sheppard

    In the realm of urban artistry, Kale Sheppard emerges as a dynamic force, weaving their identity into the tapestry of Winnipeg’s cityscape.

  • ‘Avoidable harm’

    Masked faces are few and far between as I walk through the University of Winnipeg (U of W)’s main campus in early January, watching as students brush past one another in hallways between classes or congregate around tables in the library’s mezzanines.

  • On becoming a jock

    As a kid, I enjoyed playing volleyball in gym class and tag on the playground as much as I enjoyed videogames and history class. I didn’t participate in many extracurricular activities and didn’t come from a sporty household, but during this period, sport and play were synonymous, and one’s social class was rarely equated with athletic performance.

  • Taking appropriation out of the recipe

    The cookbook is a fixture of the kitchen as much as any edible ingredient. A new exhibit at the PLATFORM Centre for Photographic and Digital Arts asks those who use the culinary tomes to engage with other cultures to consider their impact and authority.

  • Faspa brings slow food home

    If the Mennonite world had a particular scent, faspa would be its signature fragrance.

  • Reinventing the ring

    Attending your first professional wrestling match is a bit like attending a Rocky Horror Picture Show screening.

    You have to see it live. You can never fully anticipate it. And, often, it’s best to go in blind.

  • First left-wing mayor rode anger toward streetcars to office

    A day before the November 1922 Winnipeg civic election, mayoral candidate and alderman J.K. Sparling ran an ad in the Manitoba Free Press attacking his opponent S.J. Farmer.

  • Coming soon to a theatre near you and a galaxy far, far away

    On Dec. 18, Star Wars fans were greeted with a surprise announcement. This time, though, it wasn’t just another spinoff movie slated for development or a new line of action figures.

  • Signs of the times

    Like most cities, Winnipeg’s buildings tell a story about its past. Well, maybe it’s not a single story with a clearly defined arc. Perhaps, more accurately, Winnipeg’s buildings are a scattershot anthology of short stories. They range from the old and beautifully preserved to the rundown and decrepit, from quaint character neighbourhoods to rows of identical strip malls, like so many cubes of Lego, devoid of any personality whatsoever.

  • Horoscopes

    The new moon in Capricorn brings radical new beginnings.

  • Aloha means goodbye, among other things

    Over the past year, downtown denizens encountered a microcosm of tropic island life – the more luxurious parts, anyway – while walking past the Royal Albert Arms Hotel.

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