Cover Stories

  • True crime is still true life

    A cacophony of sirens blares from rescue ve- hicles as they whip past a traffic clog. Drivers tense up and look around. What happened? Is it serious? Did someone die?

  • Behind the bar

    The bands, Roman Clarke and Courtney Fox begin loading in at 4 p.m. on Thursday, Feb. 1 at the West End Cultural Centre (WECC). They are greeted by the people working the lights and sound, who started an hour earlier.

  • ‘Avoidable harm’

    Masked faces are few and far between as I walk through the University of Winnipeg (U of W)’s main campus in early January, watching as students brush past one another in hallways between classes or congregate around tables in the library’s mezzanines.

  • Reinventing the ring

    Attending your first professional wrestling match is a bit like attending a Rocky Horror Picture Show screening.

    You have to see it live. You can never fully anticipate it. And, often, it’s best to go in blind.

  • Signs of the times

    Like most cities, Winnipeg’s buildings tell a story about its past. Well, maybe it’s not a single story with a clearly defined arc. Perhaps, more accurately, Winnipeg’s buildings are a scattershot anthology of short stories. They range from the old and beautifully preserved to the rundown and decrepit, from quaint character neighbourhoods to rows of identical strip malls, like so many cubes of Lego, devoid of any personality whatsoever.

  • Something’s been brewing

    Inside the West Broadway coffee shop Thom Bargen, the whirring of coffee grinders and espresso machines mixes with the buzz of people mingling in the shop.

  • Thoroughly modern milliner

    Tucked away in a quiet corner at the Winnipeg Art Gallery and Qaumajuq’s 2023 CRAFTED show, couture milliner Helen Gair of Helen Gair Millinery selects a red beret from her display and carefully places it on the head of a curious attendee.

  • Under the influence

    During the COVID-19 pandemic, social media has become flooded with influencers on platforms like TikTok and Instagram. These influencers, despite not being traditional celebrities, impact people’s choices.

  • Finding comfort in inked skin

    Ky Quiring sits on the cream-coloured tattoo bed in their workspace. Their cowboy boot-clad feet dangle over the edge as they point out the deer antlers hanging on the wall and the preserved duck wings in a frame.

  • Breaking down barriers to trans healthcare

    “On a scale from zero to 10, where zero is being a woman and 10 is being a man, how much do you feel like a man?”

    This may sound like a question ripped from the pages of a teen magazine or an online quiz, but, until recently, it was one of the first questions encountered by many patients of the Trans Health Klinic, the only dedicated provider of transition-related healthcare in Manitoba for patients over the age of 14.

  • Love is louder than the dog whistle

    Six years ago, Bryce Byron fled the United States for Canada amid a wave of transphobia.

  • Looking beyond the landfill search

    After 10 months of protest, the search for two Long Plain First Nation women is moving forward.

  • Boundless creativity in Winnipeg

    In the words of famous American author Steven Pressfield: "Creative work is a gift to the world and every being in it. Don’t cheat us of your contribution. Give us what you’ve got.”

  • Hunger is the mother of invention

    It may be a long time until a Manitoba-style restaurant opens abroad. But rather than an indictment of our cuisine, it’s a testament to the sheer diversity of delicacies that originate from Winnipeg. From the indulgent chili-slathered Fat Boy to the iconic Pizza Pops, Winnipeg offers a motley assortment of original things to eat.

  • Spreading the sound

    The crowd swells inside and surrounds the orange temporary fencing in the Maryland Food Fare parking lot. Fontine serenades the lot filled with people, dogs, bicycles and other odd assortments. It’s a warm fall evening on a day packed with music and art. One of those Winnipeg days where people can’t decide which event to attend. Everything is the same as before, yet a little different.

  • Connecting in a creative haven

    Josiah Koppanyi is a Winnipeg-based painter, illustrator and muralist whose work explores nostalgia and faith. He shares his home with his wife, Vanessa, and Caesar, a pet lizard affectionately known as Cease Bees.

  • Challenges for daycares

    Behind Richardson College for the Environment sits a small orange building full of much smaller people. Atop three bubble-like windows, the building reads “University of Winnipeg Students’ Association Day Care.”

  • Blocked Out

    When users open Instagram on any device, search the name of any Canadian news organization and pull up the related account page, they’re met with a blank screen and the statement “People in Canada can’t see this content. In response to Canadian government legislation, news content can’t be viewed in Canada.”

  • City support for libraries is overdue

    Libraries are intersections of cultures, knowledge and accessibility within cities. 

  • Shaving, waxing, tweezing

    I keep checking under my chin for this one persistent hair that grows in fits and starts.

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