Cover Stories

  • Inflation vs. students

    Russia’s war in Ukraine has caused massive global impacts. In retaliation against Russia, many countries have stopped importing Russian oil. As such, many different industries are affected, causing a ripple effect throughout different economies.

  • Return to the earth(ship)

    Kim Chase has lived in many homes, but none as unique as her current residence. The sustainable house is mostly buried into the ground.

  • A city for all

    Winnipeg has set a goal of cutting greenhouse-gas emissions by 20 per cent by 2030. Given that residential and commercial vehicles are currently Winnipeg’s largest sources of emissions, making the city less car-centric will play a big role in meeting climate goals.

  • How long is too long?

    According to a report from the Canadian Institute for Health Information (CIHI) published in May of 2021, half of Canadians wait up to a month for ongoing counselling services, while one in 10 Canadians may wait more than four months.

  • Perception shift

    “I think we should see other people” used to be nothing more than a somewhat cliché breakup line, but more recently, it seems the phrase has taken on more nuance.

  • Foreign labour, homegrown precarity

    Canadians often don’t think about the food supply chain until their favourite leafy green or salty snack is absent from grocery-store shelves.

    What many fail to realize is that an absence of a product is often the result of the absence, or lack, of a person, too.

  • Burger time!

    Warning: this article contains mouthwatering descriptions and images of some of Winnipeg’s finest burgers. Enjoy!

  • Love beyond borders

    Globalization isn’t a new phenomenon. With increasing internet connectivity and opportunities to venture abroad, people from different countries are bonding over a love immune to culture shock – at least to a certain extent.

  • Waste not, want better

    In 2019, the Riel Community Committee asked the Standing Policy Committee on Water and Waste, Riverbank Management and the Environment to have the Winnipeg Public Service look into enacting a ban on single-use plastic bottles, straws and stir sticks at City facilities, parks and events. Three years later, the City of Winnipeg

  • Volunteer-driven

    At a time when industries are finding it extremely difficult to keep their doors open due to staffing shortages, organizations are facing similar challenges recruiting volunteers. This is an issue, as many larger music events and festivals rely heavily on volunteers to operate.

  • Who owns the streets?

    Winnipeg – particularly in the urban areas – is rife with street art, from stickers to murals and beyond. Passersby may notice reclaimed household items, painted and emblazoned with a simple message: press on. Posters are modified with robot heads, and the lost character from Where’s Waldo can be found repeatedly in different iterations.

  • History revamped

    Many Canadian cities have historical buildings modelled after European architecture. But many of those buildings have been torn down to make room for parking lots, residential multiplexes and a variety of other businesses.

  • Ending homelessness

    On Nov. 2, End Homelessness Winnipeg released the 2021 Interim Street Census. The data for this report was gathered over a 24-hour period from April 21 to 22 of this year and offers a glimpse into houselessness in Winnipeg and the most-impacted demographics.

  • This is our hair

    “Growing up, this is what we do,” local stylist and owner of BraidsbyKemLis, Kemi Lisoyi, says.

  • Speculating Manitoba, and beyond

    Literary fiction has been forever in conflict with its sibling and nemesis: genre fiction. In general, the literary world sees literary fiction as “highbrow” works that cannot be defined by their relationship to any specific genre.

  • Barriers to choice

    On Oct. 2, 2021, a crowd gathered outside the Manitoba Legislative Building in solidarity with Texans impacted by a recent United States Supreme Court decision banning abortions after six weeks. This group, led by the Women’s March Winnipeg chapter, reminded Manitobans that reproductive justice in the province has a long way to go.

  • What happened to the 99 per cent?

    It’s Oct. 15, 2011. The Arab Spring has been in progress for 10 months, Occupy Wall Street protests have been going on for just over a month and, in Winnipeg, the first Occupy event is taking place: the Occupy Winnipeg march, swiftly followed by the construction of the Occupy Winnipeg camp.

  • (Re)writing Punk

    In a building on the corner of Stradbrook Avenue and Main Street, now hiding shyly behind a denture clinic, adjacent to the rapid-transit route, lived the vibrant, (in)famous House of Beep. Named after a beloved sugary fruit drink, the House of Beep was a counterculture chapel where Winnipeg’s early punks congregated.

  • Reimagining Nuit Blanche

    Nuit Blanche Winnipeg is one of the city’s most anticipated fall events, typically spanning across the core urban area with multitudes of art installations running late into the night.

  • Empty towers

    Working from home has its perks. Sweatpants, new pets and sleep-ins are certainly appreciated by workers. For small businesses downtown, however, the lack of office workers
    due to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic has been economically devastating and has accelerated some negative trends that existed prior to 2020.

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