History

  • Critipeg: ‘We are not ruined’

    In an interview for Ric Burns’ New York (1999), urban theorist Marshall Berman discusses the role of graffiti and hip-hop in 1970 and 1980s New York. Berman refers to these forms of expression as proverbial rainbows cutting through New York’s then bleak and derelict landscapes.

  • Social media cultivates musical connections

    While established artists benefited from record-breaking streams and online concerts during the COVID-19 pandemic outbreaks, budding musicians had to find ways to reinvent themselves.

  • Back at it again

    After two years of sitting on the edge of their seats, waiting to hear whether or not they could be hosted in person, festivals all over Winnipeg will finally return.

  • Fighting for transparency with freedom of information

    Research comes in many forms. The Prison Pandemic Papers are about as form-based as it gets.

     

    The Prison Pandemic Papers research project used freedom of information requests and data science to obtain information about the state of COVID-19 in prisons over the course of the pandemic from provincial and federal bodies.

  • Origin stories: James Peebles

    Former Winnipegger and astrophysicist James Peebles recalls receiving a 5 a.m. phone call from Stockholm back in 2019. The call informed him he was the recipient of the Nobel Prize in physics.

  • What’s on your back?

    Shifting to sustainable fashion can feel intimidating. This phrase is often associated with expensive clothing, items that might not represent one’s personal style or pieces that fail to reflect current trends. This could not be further from the truth.

  • Radio is alive with a podcast flare

    Although there has been a shift from the conventional format of short talking segments in between songs, radio hosts say working behind the mic is even more exciting nowadays with the rise of social media and the podcast era.

  • Award-losing

    Will Smith slapped Chris Rock at the Academy Awards this past weekend, but I don’t want to talk about that.

  • Inflation vs. students

    Russia’s war in Ukraine has caused massive global impacts. In retaliation against Russia, many countries have stopped importing Russian oil. As such, many different industries are affected, causing a ripple effect throughout different economies.

  • Letting the community down

    On March 6, the loved ones of people who died of overdoses placed black balloons accompanied by memorials around the city. Black Balloon Day is an international event to honour those who have died of overdoses and to raise awareness about the opioid crisis.

  • So you have an STBBI. I love you.

    At one of the local clinics where I work, we have a sign that says “Shame Free Zone.”

    STBBI stands for sexually transmitted and blood-borne infections. Just like there are various types of STBBIs, there are also various ways to both transmit and pick them up. Stigma around STBBIs is still rampant today.

  • Data for the public good

    A Winnipeg Free Press story by Ryan Thorpe published in February 2022 made a big splash, revealing that “Winnipeg’s public works dept. wastes millions of tax dollars on unnecessary projects.” What was unique about this investigation was that it was based on the meticulous research of Christian Sweryda, a private citizen.

  • Winnipeg’s urban sprawl

    A recent report found that Winnipeg is growing – both in geographic footprint and population. However, from 2001 to 2021, the city’s land expansion far outpaced population growth, which led to a nearly 13 per cent decrease in density.

  • Return to the earth(ship)

    Kim Chase has lived in many homes, but none as unique as her current residence. The sustainable house is mostly buried into the ground.

  • Critipeg: Typical Toewsian tropes

    It’s fitting that a narrative about walking along the Red and Assiniboine Rivers would be published in early February, when the frozen river trail is abuzz with patrons. It is, after all, one of the most brag-worthy facts about Winnipeg, unimaginable to audiences from just about any other climate – which happens to be a young Parisian man in The Way She Closed the Door.

  • Overreaching and undermining

    Last year, student and faculty unions joined forces to fight against the Manitoba government’s overreach on post-secondary institutions through Bill 33.

    Now, it seems the provincial government is attempting to undermine the independence of post-secondary education again.

  • Pinoys on Parliament

    Organizers of Pinoys on Parliament, a national youth-led leadership conference by and for Filipino-Canadians, are busy preparing for this year’s event, which will take place at the end of May. This annual conference features workshops, panel discussions, talks and other events covering a wide range of topics.

  • Crisis in Ukraine

    Russia’s full-scale invasion of Ukraine, which started on Feb. 24, has sparked international condemnation as people around the world witness the atrocities being committed. This invasion is particularly jarring for Manitobans, given the province’s strong ties to Ukraine.

  • Origin Stories: Lubomyr Melnyk

    Lubomyr Melnyk is known for his “continuous music” style of piano playing. The rapid note-playing method was developed over many years of classical piano practice.

  • A modern-day twist on a classic

    If the literary classic To Kill A Mockingbird were adapted to reflect the current reality, what would the story look like? The answer to this question lies in Calpurnia, a new Royal Manitoba Theatre Centre (Royal MTC) production premiering on March 24.

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