History

  • U of W researchers working on global HBV study

    Members of the University of Winnipeg’s (U of W) Caribbean Research Institute have been working with a team of researchers from across the globe to uncover the historical evolution of the hepatitis B virus (HBV).

  • The intersection of colonization, climate change and mental health

    The University of Winnipeg’s Prairie Climate Centre (PCC) released new content regarding the intersection of climate change and mental health in the Climate Atlas of Canada on Oct. 10 – also known as World Mental Health Day.

  • Consequences for Bolsonaro?

    Jair Bolsonaro, president of Brazil since January 2019, is an extreme political figure. He is an admirer of the brutal Chilean dictator Augusto Pinochet, a misogynist and a science denier. Most recently, his disastrous response to the COVID-19 pandemic has led to calls for him to face criminal charges.

  • COP26 underway in Glasgow

    COP26, the United Nations’ climatechange conference, is currently underway in Glasgow, Scotland. World leaders, experts, activists and lobbyists have converged on the city to discuss and create policies to address the climate crisis.

  • City briefs

    March against police violence this weekend// Antiquity analysis at the Legislature// Municipal vaccine mandate updates// Manitoba College at 150// Strike is in session// Career supports from student services

  • Critipeg: Kímmapiiyipitssini: The Meaning of Empathy

    Plays Nov. 19 at Cinematheque

  • Help Wanted

    Shortly after the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic, policies like the Canada Emergency Response Benefit (CERB) were implemented to address the high levels of unemployment and encourage workers to stay home. Since then, the discourse on economic policy in Canada has continuously shifted.

  • To be or not to be? That is (still) the question

    William Shakespeare might have written plays during the 16th century, but the pillars of his stories prevail in the modern world. Two virtual classes, presented by theatre company Shakespeare in the Ruins (SIR) and McNally Robinson Booksellers, aim to shed light on his enduring influence.

  • ‘There is no work-life balance’

    Following a strike-averting agreement, the labour unrest among International Alliance of Theatrical Stage Employees (IATSE) members in the United States seemed to have toned down. However, concerns were  raised again following the on-set shooting death of cinematographer Halyna Hutchins while working on the film Rust.

  • The Worst Kind of Time Travel

    If the past few years have taught me anything, it’s that we’re still fighting many of the battles I thought had been won long ago.

  • Barriers to choice

    On Oct. 2, 2021, a crowd gathered outside the Manitoba Legislative Building in solidarity with Texans impacted by a recent United States Supreme Court decision banning abortions after six weeks. This group, led by the Women’s March Winnipeg chapter, reminded Manitobans that reproductive justice in the province has a long way to go.

  • Right-wing extremism finds a foothold

    The People’s Party of Canada (PPC) made headlines last month as they garnered 5 per cent, or about 800,000 total votes, in the recent federal election. Much of their success can be attributed to the COVID-19 pandemic, which created a fertile environment for extremist conspiracy theories to thrive online.

  • Reading the TRC Calls to Action

    The National Day for Truth and Reconciliation that took place only a few weeks ago gave all Canadians the opportunity to learn about and engage with Indigenous experiences and stories.  There were both in-person and virtual events in Winnipeg that offered avenues for learning and listening, including powwows, sacred fires, walks, workshops and a youth and elder tea.

  • PPC triples vote share in federal election

    Following Canada’s federal election in September, many journalists and commentators remarked that voters elected a near-identical parliament as they did in 2019. One key difference, however, is the People’s Party of Canada’s (PPC) performance.

  • What happened to the 99 per cent?

    It’s Oct. 15, 2011. The Arab Spring has been in progress for 10 months, Occupy Wall Street protests have been going on for just over a month and, in Winnipeg, the first Occupy event is taking place: the Occupy Winnipeg march, swiftly followed by the construction of the Occupy Winnipeg camp.

  • Manitoba legislature to have land acknowledgement

    On Sept. 16, interim Premier Kelvin Goertzen announced the formation of a working group to develop “recommendation for an Indigenous land acknowledgment to be used in the Manitoba Legislature,” according to a Progressive Conservative Caucus press release.

  • Feds cut funding to local refugee organization

    Federal-government cuts to refugee services in downtown Winnipeg have CUPE 2348, which represents staff subject to these cuts, ringing alarm bells. Welcome Place Residence, run by the Manitoba Interfaith Immigration Council, has had its funding decreased by 82 per cent, according to the union.

  • When in Florence

    For Anne-Laurence Caudano, a professor in the University of Winnipeg’s (U of W) history department, her love of the past began in childhood. “I always wanted to do something historical,” Caudano says.

  • City briefts

    Post-election processing panel// Mennonite centennial conference// Gandhi and the partition of India// Research office relocates// Byelections begin// Restarting the Helen Betty Osborne scholarships

  • Millennial blues

    Recently, a very interesting video has been circulating various social-media platforms. In it, an older, seemingly wiser Steve from Blue’s Clues – the beloved television show many millennials grew up watching – gives a heartfelt speech about how proud he is of all that we, his now-adult viewers, have accomplished.

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