History

  • Representation matters

    2022 is a municipal election year for Winnipeg. In just over seven months, voters will head to the polls to elect a new mayor and city council.

    Mayor Brian Bowman, who has been in office since 2014, is not running for a third term, leaving the top job wide open.

  • Origin story: Heather Bishop

    When Heather Bishop relocated from her hometown of Regina to Manitoba in 1975, it was a career move for the folk singer – one that turned out to be highly successful.

    “Winnipeg was the heart of folk festivals in Canada, if not also influencing the US. I was thinking of launching a music career, and Winnipeg seemed like a good kickoff place,” Bishop says.

  • All aboard the moonlight special

    Today, Manitoba’s beaches are generally only accessible by car. However, that wasn’t always the case.

    From 1916 to 1956, hundreds and occasionally thousands of Manitobans hopped aboard an evening train that took them to Grand Beach and Winnipeg Beach.

  • How long is too long?

    According to a report from the Canadian Institute for Health Information (CIHI) published in May of 2021, half of Canadians wait up to a month for ongoing counselling services, while one in 10 Canadians may wait more than four months.

  • PROFile: ‘A Life Dream’

    Growing up in a colonial village in Havana, Cuba, Yadira Chinique de Armas was fascinated by major archaeological findings in Mesoamerica and Peru.

  • Rental report

    In December of 2021, the Institute of Urban Studies (IUS) at the University of Winnipeg released Gain, Loss, and Change: The Impact of Condos on Winnipeg Neighbourhoods, a report on the shrinking number of affordable apartments in Winnipeg, and found that over 10,000 rental apartment units had been removed from the market between 1968 and 2015.

  • Slow to act?

    After more than three weeks in downtown Ottawa, the so-called Freedom Convoy protest has ended. Police forces from across the country were instrumental in removing the occupiers, but questions remain about why it took so long.

  • City briefs

    Black balloons// Winnipeg stands with Ukraine// Going without// Winnipeg unmasked// Public works pandemonium// Council split on drug decriminalization

  • Critipeg: Nationtime

    Plays until March 11 on Cinematheque At Home

  • Getting active for a good cause

    Virtual 5Ks and other races have become increasingly popular during the COVID-19 pandemic. The ability for runners to socially distance, choose their own locations and participate at their own pace have made them an attractive option for beginners and seasoned runners alike.

  • Learning to work with the darkness

    Last year, the Village Conservatory for Music Theatre held a virtual exhibition titled Inhibition Exhibition to showcase 14 original pieces. The works were a mixture of original songs, poems, dances and short plays, created with the help of some of Winnipeg’s top arts professionals.

  • Rocking out of loneliness

    From Avril Lavigne’s comeback to Machine Gun Kelly’s emo shift after years in the rap scene, it’s clear that pop punk is back on trend. But it isn’t the only rock sub-genre making a comeback.

  • Sorrow in Ukraine

    Last week, on Feb. 24, Russia began a full-scale invasion of Ukraine. It’s an event many of us in the diaspora have spent much of the last decade warning could happen, while hoping that it never would.

  • PROFile: Bias toward body type

    Originally from Novosibirsk, Russia, Olya Bryksina considers herself a Winnipegger after 20 years living in the city.

    She teaches consumer behaviour, a psychology-based approach to understanding what motivates consumers. Bryksina’s research recently won a Best Paper Award at the Administrative Sciences Association of Canada Conference 2020, gaining recognition for her work.

  • Virtual field trips for Black History Month

    What was first identified as Black History Week in the early 1970s was expanded to what Canadians now celebrate as Black History Month in 1976. To commemorate this, the Manitoba Museum is offering a series of virtual field trips for participants to learn about Black history in Canada.

  • Literacy campaign sheds light on Black History

    The month of February is dedicated to recognizing Black history, as well as promoting readership through I Love to Read Month. When taking both subject matters into account, storytelling and literature are crucial resources to understanding Black history and deconstructing racism. Aware of this, Black History Manitoba (BHM) offers various resources to help expose the community to Black history, which is often overlooked in school textbooks.

  • Verdict on a Winnipeg urban legend

    Longtime readers of The Uniter may know that I have a fascination with odd bits of Winnipeg past and its many urban legends. Over the years, I’ve written stories about the histories of various Winnipeg things, including vaudeville, movie theatres, funeral homes and prohibition.

  • Foreign labour, homegrown precarity

    Canadians often don’t think about the food supply chain until their favourite leafy green or salty snack is absent from grocery-store shelves.

    What many fail to realize is that an absence of a product is often the result of the absence, or lack, of a person, too.

  • Fight or Flight

    For many bird owners in Winnipeg, their feathered friends are more than pets. They are companions, even family members.

  • Arts briefs

    A field trip through Black History// Honour and Reverence// Rediscovering Rooster Town// FUNdrive!// Kickstarting the Dead Work Collective

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