Politics

  • ‘This city is a car city’

    During the first waves of the COVID-19 pandemic, many people were required to work and study from home. As fewer people travelled into the downtown core to go to the office or classes, the streets were fairly quiet, and parking was much easier to find.

  • Manitoba legislature to have land acknowledgement

    On Sept. 16, interim Premier Kelvin Goertzen announced the formation of a working group to develop “recommendation for an Indigenous land acknowledgment to be used in the Manitoba Legislature,” according to a Progressive Conservative Caucus press release.

  • City briefs

    New labs go live// Watching the vote on Bill 207// Public cannabis consumption cancelled// Speakers on supporting the unsheltered// Riley Lecture on the Sixties Scoop// Congratulations, graduates!

  • City briefs

    Four things to fear downtown// DJing and drag at interdependent driving decennial// Equity in access to (canine) contraception// Get vaxxed on campus// Cyber Sanctuaries at 1C03// Byelections, senators and students-at-large

  • Empty towers

    Working from home has its perks. Sweatpants, new pets and sleep-ins are certainly appreciated by workers. For small businesses downtown, however, the lack of office workers
    due to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic has been economically devastating and has accelerated some negative trends that existed prior to 2020.

  • Well, that accomplished nothing

    In the ramp-up to the Canadian federal election on Monday, Sept. 20, politicians and news media alike were reminding voters that this would be the “most important” election of our lifetimes. But when the smoke cleared and the votes were tallied, it may well have been the least consequential election in Canadian history.

  • ‘More than students’

    Post-secondary students across Canada have been overwhelmed with challenges, as the COVID-19 pandemic continues to exacerbate poverty, mental-health issues, the housing crisis and overall quality of education. Many students have found themselves without work, without community and without support from their homes away from home – their universities.

  • Affordable housing and the federal election

    With less than a week left in the federal election campaign, affordable housing is at the forefront of policy discussions, and all parties have released their plans to address it. House prices have been rapidly increasing in most areas of Canada, and, according to a recent poll, affordable housing is one of the most important issues for voters.

  • Bill 64 is no more

    After a summer of seeing “Stop Bill 64” lawn signs across Manitoba and much organized opposition, Bill 64 is dead. Earlier this month, Manitoba’s interim Premier Kelvin Goertzen announced the cancellation of the unpopular education reform legislation spearheaded by his predecessor.

  • City briefs

    Last late-summer late-night market // Defining research data // Walk in a United way // National Day for Truth and Reconciliation // Shoal Lake 40 water update // Vaccine mandate updates

  • The wrong election

    On Sept. 20, Manitobans will, like the rest of Canada, head out to the polls to vote in the upcoming federal election. The election was called by Prime Minister Justin Trudeau two years early, a decision that left many Canadians scratching our heads. Conventional wisdom is that Trudeau, whose popularity rose due to his COVID-19 pandemic response, hoped to seize the moment and snag a majority government. The unpopular decision to call the election in the middle of said pandemic, however, has that popularity rapidly declining.

  • Hayer takes the helm of UWSA

    Back to school at the University of Winnipeg (U of W) means new student leaders and lots of planning for the coming year. At the end of last year, U of W students chose a new slate of representatives.

  • City briefs

    U of W vaccination mandate update // Doors Open Winnipeg is back // Rock climb online // Virtual Pride panel // Federal election voting details // When Veins Meet Like Rivers at Plug-In

  • The feds giveth, and the feds taketh away

    While liberal and conservative political commentators alike characterize youth in post-secondary programs as politically engaged in the extreme, voter turnout rates over the past 30 years suggest that while the youth (typically defined as those between 18 and 24 years of age) vote is currently the largest voting bloc by age, young people have been casting fewer and fewer votes since the 1990s.

  • Distress from afar

    Close your eyes and envision education for all, peaceful gatherings and women rising the workforce ladder. This was Afghanistan’s trajectory before the atrocities that have flooded media outlets in the past weeks.

  • Freedom of information at risk with Bill 49

    Premier Brian Pallister’s response to the COVID-19 pandemic has been roundly criticized by the opposition, local news media and community activists alike. But beyond the pandemic response itself, Pallister’s Progressive Conservative (PC) government has also been accused of using the pandemic as cover to push through anti-democratic legislation.

  • Hydro tensions

    Strikes and opposition to Bill 35 creating friction at Manitoba Hydro

  • Protest, Activism, Whimsy and Self-Care

    University of Manitoba’s School of Art presents exhibit within Animal Crossing

  • One green city

    To prioritize a city’s well-being, invest in green spaces

  • Whose Portage Place?

    Concerns raised over shopping mall’s redevelopment

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