Health

  • Transitioning in the pandemic

    Last week on Transgender Day of Visibility, Statistics Canada posted the 2021 census data on trans and non-binary identities to Twitter. Ironically, since the census is completed by one person of the household – for families, usually a parent – this doesn’t account for all the trans and non-binary people whose gender identity was miscategorized, either because they aren’t out or because their gender identity isn’t respected.

  • City briefs

    In-person graduation is back// Composting gets cash influx// Understanding C-11// Honouring Eishia Hudson// UW prof receives funding boost for space research// Public health directed by private interests

  • Social diagnosis

    Since TikTok’s rise in popularity, many have applauded the algorithm that feeds viewers content tailored to their interests. With more popularity comes more content covering different topics and specialists who have found a space to educate others, including through videos talking about mental health.

  • Crispy fried mushrooms

    These mushrooms are so flavourful and crunchy!

  • Against caution

    Recently, I took one of my procrastination plunges into YouTube and watched the latest video from my favourite channel, Oh Stephco!

    In it, Stephanie, a Black woman in her late 30s, gives frank and funny anecdotes about navigating a world that does not always value her.

  • Fighting for transparency with freedom of information

    Research comes in many forms. The Prison Pandemic Papers are about as form-based as it gets.

     

    The Prison Pandemic Papers research project used freedom of information requests and data science to obtain information about the state of COVID-19 in prisons over the course of the pandemic from provincial and federal bodies.

  • What’s on your back?

    Shifting to sustainable fashion can feel intimidating. This phrase is often associated with expensive clothing, items that might not represent one’s personal style or pieces that fail to reflect current trends. This could not be further from the truth.

  • So you have an STBBI. I love you.

    At one of the local clinics where I work, we have a sign that says “Shame Free Zone.”

    STBBI stands for sexually transmitted and blood-borne infections. Just like there are various types of STBBIs, there are also various ways to both transmit and pick them up. Stigma around STBBIs is still rampant today.

  • PROFile: Teaching through therapy

    Mary-Jo Bolton approaches teaching in a way that incorporates her therapist background.

    “I try (to) conduct that class almost the way I would try and conduct a therapy relationship, knowing that people need to feel safe and listened to and valued,” she says.

  • Student Groups: Alive and well

    Although the University of Winnipeg (U of W) has eschewed almost all public events since the beginning of the COVID19 pandemic, student groups did not disappear. Many are still alive and active, and the University of Winnipeg Students’ Association (UWSA) continues to assist student groups in different ways.

  • Students who come together, stay together

    I’m one of many who experienced a majority of my university life on campus before the COVID-19 shutdown forced classes online.

    The University of Winnipeg (U of W) would be bustling with people trying to get to their classes or trying to claim a spot at Stella’s across the street.

  • New Bill Wedlake Fitness Centre policy

    After closing down for several months in response to provincial public-health orders, the staff of the Bill Wedlake Fitness Centre reopened the gym in August of last year. The fitness centre, which sits in the middle of the U of W campus in the Axworthy Health & RecPlex building, lets students, staff and community members improve and sustain their fitness and wellbeing while cooped up in the middle of the pandemic.

  • City briefs

    Rally For a Better Manitoba// Survivors legacy conference// The high cost of cutting healthcare// New resource for Indigenous students// Understanding performance-based funding// All health orders lifted

  • Venues adapt to relaxed restrictions

    When the Manitoba government announced that COVID-19 restrictions would be slowly lifted, it gave entertainment venues a lot to consider.

  • Neverending waitlist

    This February marks one year of waiting for a surgery I was told I would receive in three months. I am not alone in this. The organization Doctors Manitoba currently estimates there are 161,585 Manitobans waiting for surgeries or other diagnostic procedures, such as MRIs and endoscopies.

  • Support in seven pages

    I sat, hunched, in the emergency room for six hours before being shuttled down the corridor to yet another crammed, industrial space. I don’t remember the colour of the curtains hung around my bed (likely beige) or the precise antiseptic scent in the air.

  • Searching for Solace

    I think if you ask anyone in the UkrainianCanadian diaspora how they’re doing, most of us will tell you that the last two weeks have been among the worst, most stressful periods of our lives. That’s certainly been the case for me.

  • How long is too long?

    According to a report from the Canadian Institute for Health Information (CIHI) published in May of 2021, half of Canadians wait up to a month for ongoing counselling services, while one in 10 Canadians may wait more than four months.

  • ‘Just doing something shameful’

    Amid the flags, signs and trailers that greeted me when I stepped outside my front door last month, one cluster of people caught my attention. It was the morning of Feb. 4, and a journalist stood at the crosswalk connecting Broadway and Memorial, interviewing unmasked protestors.

  • Rental report

    In December of 2021, the Institute of Urban Studies (IUS) at the University of Winnipeg released Gain, Loss, and Change: The Impact of Condos on Winnipeg Neighbourhoods, a report on the shrinking number of affordable apartments in Winnipeg, and found that over 10,000 rental apartment units had been removed from the market between 1968 and 2015.

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