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  • Shattered images

    The invitation arrives misaddressed.

  • Honourable abuse

    No Canadian senator has even been stripped of their “honourable” title in history.

  • Schools aren’t safe

    Earlier this school year, West Kildonan Collegiate announced its “commitment to eliminate vaping and large groups gathering in the washrooms” on campus.

  • On the rise of online scams

    Pyramid schemes, grifting and scams have been ingrained into our economy, culture and social imaginary far longer than dial-up.

  • You’re banning the wrong books

    Every book has a lifespan, especially when it belongs to a public library.

  • HIV disclosure laws in Canada hurt more than they protect

    HIV stands for human immunodeficiency virus. If left untreated, HIV can develop into AIDS: acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

  • ‘Made to feel complicit’

    In a boardroom of about 20 prospective interns, I learned the first rule of sports media: don’t look down in the locker room.

  • Police services aren’t corporations

    Recent inquiries into the actions of the RCMP in high-profile cases over the last few years, including the 2020 killing of 22 people in Nova Scotia and the multiple stabbing attacks in Saskatchewan in recent weeks, have put discussions regarding RCMP responses, and police reform and transparency, at the forefront of many Canadians’ minds.

  • House of the Dragon’s Moralizing discourse

    Since its premier in August, House of the Dragon, HBO’s prequel series to its controversial fantasy blockbuster Game of Thrones, has already slotted itself into its predecessor’s position in the weekly thinkpiece factory.

  • ‘Just have a glass of wine’

    I made the appointment to talk about other kinds of pain.

  • A misplaced morality in sports

    “No time period in baseball is clean,” Matt Snyder writes for CBS Sports.

  • Scamming and streaming

    Netflix’s scammer series have recently emerged as the new pop-culture trend. The Tinder Swindler, Inventing Anna and even Bad Vegan have been well-received by critics and audiences alike. It seems rather strategic that these documentaries and series based on true stories premiered so close to one another, keeping the audience hooked and wanting more.

  • Transitioning in the pandemic

    Last week on Transgender Day of Visibility, Statistics Canada posted the 2021 census data on trans and non-binary identities to Twitter. Ironically, since the census is completed by one person of the household – for families, usually a parent – this doesn’t account for all the trans and non-binary people whose gender identity was miscategorized, either because they aren’t out or because their gender identity isn’t respected.

  • A virtual love story

    Even though I hadn’t seen most of my American family members in months, I didn’t feel homesick until I saw a photo.

  • My future career hasn’t been invented yet

    My father always told me to pursue whatever I was passionate about, because my future career hadn’t been invented yet. This advice is a clear product of the world my father inhabited. He grew up as a farmer in the 1970s and went to a free college to study computer networks just in time to get a career in the booming tech scene of the ’90s.

  • To post or not to post?

    Growing up, social media was new and something fun to do. It was a way for people to see what another person’s life was like through the screen of a phone.

    Many people have now made careers out of social media. Some of these positions include work as social-media managers, communications coordinators, YouTubers or influencers.

  • ‘Gay’ isn’t a bad word

    Not much has changed about my high school in the decade since I graduated. The halls may be painted a slightly different colour, and I now walk them as an educator, but they still echo with students casually dropping “that’s so gay” or “no homo” into conversation.

  • Letting the community down

    On March 6, the loved ones of people who died of overdoses placed black balloons accompanied by memorials around the city. Black Balloon Day is an international event to honour those who have died of overdoses and to raise awareness about the opioid crisis.

  • Support in seven pages

    I sat, hunched, in the emergency room for six hours before being shuttled down the corridor to yet another crammed, industrial space. I don’t remember the colour of the curtains hung around my bed (likely beige) or the precise antiseptic scent in the air.

  • Carbon’s ugly cousin: methane

    Most Winnipeggers likely think the only options for their waste are “recycling” or “garbage.” Even a lot of environmentalists who try to avoid plastic packaging likely toss their organic matter in the trash without wringing their hands over it too much. But when those potato peels, eggshells and old leftovers decompose in the landfill, they produce methane.

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