Culture

  • PROFile: Adopting Indigenous philosophy

    Prior to completing her PhD, Romanow finished a master’s in economics and then worked with a tribal council on economic development. From there, she went into consulting with First Nations in Manitoba and across Canada.

  • Fighting for transparency with freedom of information

    Research comes in many forms. The Prison Pandemic Papers are about as form-based as it gets.

     

    The Prison Pandemic Papers research project used freedom of information requests and data science to obtain information about the state of COVID-19 in prisons over the course of the pandemic from provincial and federal bodies.

  • City briefs

    Keeping up with the geography theses// Energy and the road to net-zero// No more daily data// Transit app making maiden voyage// Summer convention in person again// Whale watching on the web

  • Arts briefs

    MCO announces spring concert// Vintage, handmade and more// Harry Manx at the WECC// A jam session for a good cause// Mahogany Frog releases new album// Art Talk: The Photograph as Art

  • Origin stories: James Peebles

    Former Winnipegger and astrophysicist James Peebles recalls receiving a 5 a.m. phone call from Stockholm back in 2019. The call informed him he was the recipient of the Nobel Prize in physics.

  • Lights, camera, action

    With the COVID-19 pandemic making it hard for local filmmakers to exhibit their work, the Winnipeg Film Group (WFG) decided to share the backlog of Winnipeg-based productions through their members’ screenings. The first screening took place on March 19, and the following two will happen on April 2 and 22.

  • What’s on your back?

    Shifting to sustainable fashion can feel intimidating. This phrase is often associated with expensive clothing, items that might not represent one’s personal style or pieces that fail to reflect current trends. This could not be further from the truth.

  • Radio is alive with a podcast flare

    Although there has been a shift from the conventional format of short talking segments in between songs, radio hosts say working behind the mic is even more exciting nowadays with the rise of social media and the podcast era.

  • Award-losing

    Will Smith slapped Chris Rock at the Academy Awards this past weekend, but I don’t want to talk about that.

  • Inflation vs. students

    Russia’s war in Ukraine has caused massive global impacts. In retaliation against Russia, many countries have stopped importing Russian oil. As such, many different industries are affected, causing a ripple effect throughout different economies.

  • Letting the community down

    On March 6, the loved ones of people who died of overdoses placed black balloons accompanied by memorials around the city. Black Balloon Day is an international event to honour those who have died of overdoses and to raise awareness about the opioid crisis.

  • So you have an STBBI. I love you.

    At one of the local clinics where I work, we have a sign that says “Shame Free Zone.”

    STBBI stands for sexually transmitted and blood-borne infections. Just like there are various types of STBBIs, there are also various ways to both transmit and pick them up. Stigma around STBBIs is still rampant today.

  • PROFile: Teaching through therapy

    Mary-Jo Bolton approaches teaching in a way that incorporates her therapist background.

    “I try (to) conduct that class almost the way I would try and conduct a therapy relationship, knowing that people need to feel safe and listened to and valued,” she says.

  • Student Groups: Alive and well

    Although the University of Winnipeg (U of W) has eschewed almost all public events since the beginning of the COVID19 pandemic, student groups did not disappear. Many are still alive and active, and the University of Winnipeg Students’ Association (UWSA) continues to assist student groups in different ways.

  • Data for the public good

    A Winnipeg Free Press story by Ryan Thorpe published in February 2022 made a big splash, revealing that “Winnipeg’s public works dept. wastes millions of tax dollars on unnecessary projects.” What was unique about this investigation was that it was based on the meticulous research of Christian Sweryda, a private citizen.

  • Winnipeg’s urban sprawl

    A recent report found that Winnipeg is growing – both in geographic footprint and population. However, from 2001 to 2021, the city’s land expansion far outpaced population growth, which led to a nearly 13 per cent decrease in density.

  • Return to the earth(ship)

    Kim Chase has lived in many homes, but none as unique as her current residence. The sustainable house is mostly buried into the ground.

  • Arts briefs

    Investigations into motion capture/ Bushland Series at cre8ery/ Calling all green thumbs/ WCD presents in between here and now/ Decolonizing Lens: Tia and Piujuq/ Apply for Plug-In ICA’s Summer Institute

  • Critipeg: Typical Toewsian tropes

    It’s fitting that a narrative about walking along the Red and Assiniboine Rivers would be published in early February, when the frozen river trail is abuzz with patrons. It is, after all, one of the most brag-worthy facts about Winnipeg, unimaginable to audiences from just about any other climate – which happens to be a young Parisian man in The Way She Closed the Door.

  • New musical seeks audience feedback

    Many theatrical groups were hard at work during the COVID-19 pandemic, preparing performances to show off once venues reopened.

    Walk&Talk Theatre Company went a little further by starting a pre-pandemic project, taking a break from it, then bringing it back to life.

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