Canada is good enough

Young artists highlight just how supportive the flourishing Canadian music industry is

Although Canada may have a smaller music industry than the United Kingdom or the United States, there are a variety of opportunities to grow here, and there are young artists taking advantage of them.

Matthew V, a young pop artist based in Vancouver, B.C., has an upcoming Canadian tour opening for the synth-pop singer Ralph. The tour starts in Victoria, B.C. on March 10 and, after travelling British Columbia and Alberta, stops in Winnipeg at the Good Will Social Club on March 16.

Matthew V has trained in classical music since childhood, and though he went to London, England to pursue a four-year musical program, his priorities quickly changed after coming back home.

“When I came home in the summer after my first year abroad, I ended up signing a record deal with 604 Records in Vancouver,” he says.

“At that moment, I decided to stay here and pursue a musical career on home turf. Vancouver feels like home, and I would love for this city to always be my home base.”

Lindsay Thomson is a Winnipeg-based artist and the leader of the indie band LLUX. After the group’s performance at the Good Will earlier this year, the band released the singles ‘The Drive’ and ‘Molly.’

Thomson recently moved to Winnipeg and after taking a songwriting program in Ottawa, the artist is ready to spread her wings in Manitoba.

“Winnipeg is a perfect city to come in and learn some new music,” she says.

“I feel so grateful to be in Winnipeg. Everyone is so supportive.”

Matthew V says that the last two years have been eye-opening for him, as he discovered just how vast the music industry is in Canada. He reveals one of the main influences behind career growth and success:

“We live in the age of the internet, and people can really get the ball rolling from wherever they are,” he says.

“Once you have a good product people can connect with, anyone can get started from wherever they choose to. There is no roadblock that can inhibit an artist’s career in Canada, especially in 2020.”

Though these artists are based in different provinces, create music in different genres and appeal to different audiences, one commonality that shines in both is humility.

Matthew V says, “as I have had more experience in this industry, I have found that I am now less focused on the amount of success that I have and more focused on making things that I am proud of.

“If a big record company offered me guaranteed stardom to make music I did not like, I do not think I would take that opportunity. I am very lucky to have a team that lets me make things that I want to make.”

Thomson concurs and says, “I would love for this to become a career, but you do not have to reach a crazy level of stardom to have a career.

“Having a nice, humble fanbase would be great.”

Published in Volume 74, Number 19 of The Uniter (February 27, 2020)

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