Columns

  • Reading in Colour

    Visibility matters

  • Listen up, leaders

    In Manitoba, this week has seen growing calls for Premier Brian Pallister and Health Minister Cameron Friesen to resign over their disastrous mismanagement of COVID-19.

  • What to expect when you’re expecting to be hospitalized

    Life on the borderline

  • I’m a Trebekkie

    This week marks two significant dates regarding iconic Canadian broadcasters.

  • Immigrants and reform

    Foreigner Affairs

  • Thank you, Goddess

    BDSM requires skillful and intentional communication. It is the ménage à trois of intimacy, tenderness and vulnerability. 

  • Thirty-something

    It’s that time of year: voting for the Uniter 30 is open again!

  • Reading in colour

    The messages children are exposed to through books shape their ideas about themselves and others. 

  • Are you there, diagnosis? It’s me, Hannah.

    Shortly after giving birth to my first and only child, I was diagnosed with postpartum depression. It was the wrong diagnosis.

  • Steps toward inclusivity

    By simply allowing ourselves to open our social circles to people we may not normally interact with, we can begin to close this gap, aiming to eradicate the idea of the “other” from our societal conscious.

  • Wetness and liberated pleasure in Winnipeg

    Each month, Mother of Goo will research an activity/community on the sensual-sexual spectrum.

  • Why we should diversify our reading habits

    Reading literature from various groups and on diverse subjects enables readers to broaden their understanding of themselves.

  • Collective grief and the individual

    “I can’t be grieving. I haven’t lost anyone.”

  • City Roots

    Over the past few months, this column has made a case for a closer look at Winnipeggers’ relationship with trees, both past and present. I have been able to consider what they do for humans, as well as their own agency, and to think about how they became so central to Winnipeg’s identity as a city.

  • Feeding diaspora

    I immediately swoon at the love, lineage, healing and pleasure that undertones writing and art by People of Colour involving food. Food and love are both so potent. They are embodied experiences marked by longing, sustenance, nourishment, orientation and legacy.

  • Halfway to somewhere

    The idea of walking a mile in someone else’s shoes is a common metaphor for how people should empathize with one another. I see this show up in little ways in my everyday conversations. When a friend tells me something they’re struggling with, I find myself responding with a story of a situation I’ve been in that is comparable in order to identify with their struggle.

  • City Roots

    When I was 12, my best friend’s dad died suddenly. One minute, he was this gentle, funny and active man, and the next, he was gone. 

  • Feeding diaspora

    Food is a powerful storyteller, so rich and multi-sensory that the mere image of it brings potent memories and associations. Many diasporic artists work with food iconography and names, because it is an accessible way to communicate cultural identity, lineage, home and double-meanings.

  • Crystal clear

    Throughout history, there have always been standards of beauty, particularly for women. In ancient Egypt (c. 3150 to 332 BCE), the ideal woman was slender, youthful, and heavily made up. Society promoted a sex-positive environment. Premarital sex was entirely acceptable, and women could divorce their husbands without shame.

  • Halfway to somewhere

    For the past year, I’ve been working on an academic research project in which I interview individuals from the trans community who belong to generations before me.

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