Columns

  • Unclear critical-minerals strategy sparks demand for answers

    While navigating the climate crisis, governments have to balance people’s needs with the planet’s health. Switching to wind turbines and electric cars obviously helps wean communities off coal and oil. However, renewable energy systems come with their own environmental risks.

  • Burrowing

    By some accidental sequence of thoughtless actions, I discovered the possibility of disappearing into a man’s life for a day, a week, a short time, burrowing into a shared warmth, a stillness away from the ever-moving surface of everyday life.

  • Consent isn’t rocket science

    For this month’s Mother of Goo, I felt like getting back down to basics: consent.

  • The political evolution of Edith Hancox

    In last month’s “A people’s history of Winnipeg” column, I introduced Edith Hancox, a socialist and feminist organizer involved in the 1919 Winnipeg General Strike and activism throughout the 1920s.

  • Build it, and they shall bike

    In 2021, Coun. Matt Allard, then the chair of Winnipeg’s infrastructure and public-works committee, requested increased funding for active transit.

  • Ecosexuality: I kiss the ground I walk upon

    Performance artist and sexologist Annie Sprinkle and her partner, University of California art-department chair and professor Beth Stephens, are credited with popularizing what is recognized today as ecosexuality.

  • Turning 24

    January 2023 hit like a ton of bricks, and something else is on the way: my 24th birthday.

  • Introducing Edith Hancox, socialist feminist

    In early September 1919, thousands of Women’s Labour League meeting attendees resolved to march to Manitoba’s provincial legislature and demand that jailed strike leaders be released from prison.

  • Deicing’s impact on Lake Winnipeg

    Most Winnipeggers can recall a time they slipped down frozen porch steps or skidded through an icy road’s stop sign.

  • Pleasure is power

    I first wrote about pleasure activism in September of 2020 for my first Mother of Goo column.

  • Grey areas

    My sister and I call them “grey areas.”

  • Pop my cherry!

    Virginity is a loaded word.

  • Your lawn isn’t as green as it looks

    There isn’t an ecological disaster in your backyard. Your yard is the ecological disaster.

  • Sex work laws in Canada reek of moralism

    The term “prostitute/prostitution” is used in Canadian law, but the preferred terminology is sex worker/sex work.

  • I don’t have friends

    Reading week was rough. On the second lonely night, I waited for my sister to come home from the library.

  • Gets her salad tossed

    In the shower, high on psilocybin, I ate ass for the first time.

  • A burial ‘good enough for Jesus’

    Death is an uncomfortable topic, especially since everyone’s inevitable demise could harm the planet. It seems people can’t even die without adding to their carbon footprints.

  • Privileged

    Nitumie ka-mia mbili,” Mom texts. I roll my eyes. But I send her the $200 immediately.

  • Winnipeg’s Next Mayor

    Municipal elections may seem like small potatoes in the looming climate crisis, but their results significantly impact how people live day to day.

  • Stigmata: stigma’s origin in religious ecstasy

    The word “stigma” comes from a Latin word meaning that a person is marked or branded.

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