Pop Culture

  • The antisocial dilemma

    Social media algorithms aren’t mysterious, scheming voices instructing us to do this or that. They aren’t telling us anything new or introducing brand-new behaviours or ideas from scratch.

  • Horoscopes

    Your horoscope for Thursday, April 2, 2020.

  • Let her speak

    With most professional and amateur sports leagues around the world on hiatus amid the COVID-19 pandemic and the Olympics postponed until 2021, it can seem like sports have been reduced to reruns, along with the “see 10, do 10” push-up chain and toilet paper challenge attempts athletes post on Instagram.

  • Changes in social change

    From youth organizing to civil rights movements to the evolving social discourse, a lot has changed for people engaging in activism, community work and advocacy in Winnipeg during the past decade.

  • Are social distancing practices overrated? Not remotely

    Four years ago, Angie St. Mars decided to take the chance to try standup comedy, and she never stopped.

  • Circus play!

    Charles Lauder (Sleepy) is the current president of the Winnipeg Circus Club (WCC). This is the third time Lauder has been elected to the position. One of the reasons Sleepy loves being a clown is “because you can dabble your giant tippy-toe in pretty much anything,” including juggling, balloons, comedy, stage shows and birthday parties.

  • Crystal clear

    Throughout history, there have always been standards of beauty, particularly for women. In ancient Egypt (c. 3150 to 332 BCE), the ideal woman was slender, youthful, and heavily made up. Society promoted a sex-positive environment. Premarital sex was entirely acceptable, and women could divorce their husbands without shame.

  • Far from a slam dunk

    In the weeks since former NBA star Kobe Bryant’s untimely death in a helicopter crash, it’s been nearly impossible to browse the internet without seeing tributes to the 41-year-old basketball legend.

  • Laughs with friends

    After all the Valentine's Day chocolates have gone on sale, Wee Johnny’s will host a special open mic celebrating friends. Comedian Angie St. Mars hosts a monthly storytelling comedy event at Wee Johnny’s on the last Saturday of every month.

  • More than skin deep

    It’s cold out there, folks. As I write this, there is an extreme cold warning across all of southern Manitoba, including Winnipeg.

  • Winnipeg inkmasters: not just a boys’ club

    With images of tough biker dudes and full sleeves in mind, it can be easy to imagine tattooing as an exclusive boys’ club for the tough and mighty.

  • CRITIPEG: Uncut Gems

    The pre-release hype for Uncut Gems achieved a fever pitch rivalled only by the frustration over its tiny theatrical rollout. 

  • The dollmaker’s costume closet

    Whether it be for cosplay or dollmaking, Emma Horning finds a great deal of delight in creating some really cool stuff.

  • Another fail for the Academy

    Another awards season is approaching, and another failure to recognize women in Hollywood is at our doorsteps.

  • CRITIPEG: Stranger pranks

    Stranger Things star Gaten Matarazzo’s new Netflix show brings back the prank-based comedy format of Punk’d, Candid Camera and Just for Laughs Gags.

  • Coffee brews and tap dance shoes

    Readers might recognize cohabitating partners Jordan Cayer and Ella Steele from the Winnipeg stage.

  • ‘There is something interesting about this city’

    Debuted at the Vancouver International Film Festival in September, Tapeworm arrives at Cinematheque on Nov. 14, and filmmakers Milos Mitrovic and Fabian Velasco, who are University of Winnipeg alumni, hint at the seriousness of their film.

  • A documentarian’s perspective

    For Winnipeg-based photographer – and former Uniter staff member – Mike Sudoma, his professional art and personal hobbies blend harmoniously as he enjoys street and concert photography, as well as skateboarding and playing guitar.

  • A multidisciplinary creative

    For Winnipeg creative Reba Terlson, her art is her greatest passion and a constantly shifting mode of expression.

  • An (incomplete) queer history: Winnipeg drag

    While RuPaul’s Drag Race sits at the forefront of drag representation in popular culture, there’s much more to the art form than simply female impersonation. Behind every drag performer, there are local histories spanning many decades.

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