History

  • The road behind, the road ahead

    Back in February, when staff at The Uniter chose “2020: A Decade in Review” as the theme for our annual Urban Issue, none of us could have predicted how different the world would be by April. An issue that was initially pitched as a look back at how things changed in the 2010s suddenly looks like an exploration of how quaint those changes look in the wake of what we’ve experienced in 2020.

  • Philosophy book will return to library after 43 years

    A book belonging to the University of Winnipeg (U of W) Library may finally return home after more than 40 years. Then-philosophy student Siegfried Laser borrowed Karl Popper’s The Poverty of Historicism from the library in August 1977 before embarking on a trip to Europe.

  • CRITIPEG: Gothic Canadian tale is pleasurably bleak

    “I sat on the edge of the bed, the letter loose in my hand and stared at the space before me. ‘What is this space where I have decided to live,’ I wondered. ‘What stories hidden here?’”

  • Broadening the scope

    The Manitoba Historical Society (MHS)  launched their new magazine, Prairie History, on March 6, replacing the 40-year-old Manitoba History.

  • Arts briefs

    Record Sundaze at Barn Hammer // Collage with Takashi Iwasaki // Nothin Butt ‘90s: Freeway // Crywank at Forth // Wheels & Feels // Treaty Talks with Elder Harry Bone

  • City Roots

    When I was 12, my best friend’s dad died suddenly. One minute, he was this gentle, funny and active man, and the next, he was gone. 

  • M(├ętis)anitoba 150

    The first two months of the new decade have seen a slew of initiatives branded with the Manitoba 150 logo. 

  • The true craic of St. Patrick’s Day

    Decorations, parades and even beer will soon be green, as Winnipeggers celebrate St. Patrick’s Day on March 17.

  • One last look at Alootook

    For its second art exhibit of the year, Gallery 1C03 hosts Carleton University’s (CU) Walking Both Sides of an Invisible Border.

  • Arts briefs

    Garland Party! // Transcendent // Craftivism at MAWA // Anthony OKS album release // Sounds of Curtains (now destroyed) // First Fridays - Women, Art & Identity 

  • Feeding diaspora

    Food is a powerful storyteller, so rich and multi-sensory that the mere image of it brings potent memories and associations. Many diasporic artists work with food iconography and names, because it is an accessible way to communicate cultural identity, lineage, home and double-meanings.

  • Dance Evolution

    Dance, a physically demanding art form, can offer a unique, emotionally dynamic experience where both performers and audience members contribute energy to the art piece. Animal Triste is a dance piece that creates this kind of dynamic atmosphere.

  • CRITIPEG: Uncut Gems

    The pre-release hype for Uncut Gems achieved a fever pitch rivalled only by the frustration over its tiny theatrical rollout. 

  • Learning from history

    “History doesn’t repeat itself, but it often rhymes.” That’s one of those many quotes that’s always attributed to Mark Twain, even though there’s no evidence he ever actually said it.

  • Winnipeg from A to G#

    When Winnipeggers think of their city, the first thing that comes to mind is likely not classical music.

  • City roots

    Trees are often caught up in human politics and drama on all scales. Every once in a while, these politics centre around a single tree. Such was the case of the Wolseley Elm.

  • CRITIPEG: Delivering chills

    If you’re looking for an accessible ghostly read, Haunted Manitoba by Matthew Komus delivers. 

  • Stories Left Untold

    Winnipeg’s Métis history is being explored by new public art works. 

  • A case for nostalgia

    There has been a lot of backlash against nostalgia in film over the past decade.

  • Shakespeare, through a different lens

    With the Royal Manitoba Theatre Centre’s Masters Playwright Festival coming to an end in 2020, its focus is on none other than famous playwright William Shakespeare.

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