Theatre

  • Ghost lights, cameras and acting

    Performance art in pandemic times

  • Chasing your dreams

    Winnipeg theatre artist chosen for esteemed directorial fellowship

  • A different view from the mountaintop

    RMTC production sheds light on Martin Luther King Jr.

  • Invigorating the Bard

    Origin stories: Shakespeare in the Ruins

  • What would Julie do?

    PROFile: Donna Fletcher, instructor, theatre and film department, U of W

  • ‘Clever, accessible and empathetic’

    Origin Stories: Abby Falvo

  • To be in person, or not to be in person

    That is the question the U of W theatre department has to address

  • A thousand new faces to see

    Edmonton cultural festival partners with FringeLiveStream

  • Theatre must live on

    PTE kicks off new season with free viewing

  • Truly making magic

    Origin Stories: Tracey Nepinak 

  • Back to studio

    The annual Royal Winnipeg Ballet production of The Nutcracker has been cancelled due to the COVID-19 pandemic. 

  • Safe, spaced and sound theatre

    Blink, a new theatrical collaboration between Walk and Talk Theatre Company and One Trunk Theatre, is a new science fiction comedy-drama, which will be read by actors who will be accompanied by live and pre-recorded sound effects at the West End Cultural Centre for a two-day run. 

  • A time to act

    The global resurgence of the Black Lives Matter movement has prompted the local theatre community and its historically white-led organizations to acknowledge and try to dismantle age-old barriers for local BIPOC artists.

  • Virtually yours

    The Winnipeg Fringe Theatre Festival, like many summer festivals, is moving online to help protect Winnipeggers from COVID-19. But unlike many other fests, Fringe will be free for all.

  • Arts funding is more important now than ever

    In 2013, Jessica Botelho-Urbanski wrote in The Uniter’s Urban Issue that Winnipeg could be improved with more arts funding. Unfortunately, arts funding is again on the chopping block in the municipal budget this year, facing a 10 per cent decrease.

  • Pandemic and performance

    COVID-19 and social distancing have seen the cancellation of concerts, fundraisers, socials and theatre productions on a mass scale. This has left many independent theatre artists out of work, and the specifics of the Emergency Support Benefit, which will be available to independent contractors, are yet to be determined.

  • Winnipeg’s Artists of Colour

    Many of Winnipeg’s marginalized artists are multitalented people who fall into a wide spectrum of racial categories. Their stories need to be heard, their accomplishments deserve celebration and more work needs to be done to create a more inclusive and truly diverse space.

  • A simple space with clownish traits

    As an actor, performance artist, photographer, singer, clown and so much more, Ady Kay is certifiably busy.

  • Lights, dance, action

    Plays like the Royal Manitoba Theatre Centre’s As You Like It demonstrate the success of combining literature with music and choreography to create crowd-pleasing pieces, and they set the stage for others to follow suit.

  • Making arts funding accessible

    Last year, the Canada Council for the Arts (Canada Council) and Manitoba Arts Council implemented huge changes in their funding programs. Both launched new initiatives for Indigenous arts funding, online application systems and supports for grant applications.

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