City

  • Venues adapt to relaxed restrictions

    When the Manitoba government announced that COVID-19 restrictions would be slowly lifted, it gave entertainment venues a lot to consider.

  • Sheegl’s shame

    This week, news broke about one of the biggest political scandals in Winnipeg’s history. A judge ruled that Phil Sheegl, Winnipeg’s former chief administrative officer, accepted a $327,000 bribe from Armik Babakhanians in order to award Babakhanians’ company, Caspian Construction, the contract to build the new Winnipeg Police Service headquarters.

  • A city for all

    Winnipeg has set a goal of cutting greenhouse-gas emissions by 20 per cent by 2030. Given that residential and commercial vehicles are currently Winnipeg’s largest sources of emissions, making the city less car-centric will play a big role in meeting climate goals.

  • Neverending waitlist

    This February marks one year of waiting for a surgery I was told I would receive in three months. I am not alone in this. The organization Doctors Manitoba currently estimates there are 161,585 Manitobans waiting for surgeries or other diagnostic procedures, such as MRIs and endoscopies.

  • Support in seven pages

    I sat, hunched, in the emergency room for six hours before being shuttled down the corridor to yet another crammed, industrial space. I don’t remember the colour of the curtains hung around my bed (likely beige) or the precise antiseptic scent in the air.

  • Carbon’s ugly cousin: methane

    Most Winnipeggers likely think the only options for their waste are “recycling” or “garbage.” Even a lot of environmentalists who try to avoid plastic packaging likely toss their organic matter in the trash without wringing their hands over it too much. But when those potato peels, eggshells and old leftovers decompose in the landfill, they produce methane.

  • Donation processing

    On Feb. 14, hackers accessed and released the personal information of those who donated to the so-called Freedom Convoy through GiveSendGo, a Christian crowdfunding site that facilitates public donations.

  • Welcome to Winterpeg

    Winnipeg is known for its cold winters. Depending on who you ask, “Winterpeg” is used to refer to Manitoba’s capital either as a badge of toughness and grit, or as part of a deprecating comment implying we’d rather be in Hawaii. Though Winnipeggers are used to harsh winters, this year’s has been particularly difficult.

  • Representation matters

    2022 is a municipal election year for Winnipeg. In just over seven months, voters will head to the polls to elect a new mayor and city council.

    Mayor Brian Bowman, who has been in office since 2014, is not running for a third term, leaving the top job wide open.

  • City briefs

    Rally against police brutality// Shining through the snowfall// Got Glenwood zoning opinions?// Free tests hit retailers and libraries// Failure to consult faculty// Walby publishes Prison Pandemic Papers

  • Arts briefs

    McNish: Variety of Connections// The Festival of Fools is back!// The Prairie Joggers at the Daughter// Opening reception: Feast, Famine// Black Horror series at Cinematheque// The WSO presents The Spirit Horse Returns

  • Origin story: Heather Bishop

    When Heather Bishop relocated from her hometown of Regina to Manitoba in 1975, it was a career move for the folk singer – one that turned out to be highly successful.

    “Winnipeg was the heart of folk festivals in Canada, if not also influencing the US. I was thinking of launching a music career, and Winnipeg seemed like a good kickoff place,” Bishop says.

  • RWB dancer returns for The Sleeping Beauty

    To live life to the fullest is to focus on your passions as if there were no tomorrow. After receiving a brain cancer diagnosis in 2013, dancer and former Broadway performer Catherine Wreford Ledlow decided to return to Winnipeg and take a second shot at dance.

  • Promoting music with (real) love

    For emerging and established artists, getting the word out about upcoming gigs is the secret ingredient for a great show. Real Love Winnipeg recognized this need and now works to build community between music lovers and makers.

  • All aboard the moonlight special

    Today, Manitoba’s beaches are generally only accessible by car. However, that wasn’t always the case.

    From 1916 to 1956, hundreds and occasionally thousands of Manitobans hopped aboard an evening train that took them to Grand Beach and Winnipeg Beach.

  • How long is too long?

    According to a report from the Canadian Institute for Health Information (CIHI) published in May of 2021, half of Canadians wait up to a month for ongoing counselling services, while one in 10 Canadians may wait more than four months.

  • ‘Just doing something shameful’

    Amid the flags, signs and trailers that greeted me when I stepped outside my front door last month, one cluster of people caught my attention. It was the morning of Feb. 4, and a journalist stood at the crosswalk connecting Broadway and Memorial, interviewing unmasked protestors.

  • Rental report

    In December of 2021, the Institute of Urban Studies (IUS) at the University of Winnipeg released Gain, Loss, and Change: The Impact of Condos on Winnipeg Neighbourhoods, a report on the shrinking number of affordable apartments in Winnipeg, and found that over 10,000 rental apartment units had been removed from the market between 1968 and 2015.

  • Time to Renterii!

    Renterii, a new item-rental app from a Winnipeg tech startup, all began with a simple mission: to rent a kayak. Launched in summer 2021 by Jordan Smith, Dennis Cheong and Dany Cheong, it is an app where individuals and businesses can list, discover and rent out items.

  • Slow to act?

    After more than three weeks in downtown Ottawa, the so-called Freedom Convoy protest has ended. Police forces from across the country were instrumental in removing the occupiers, but questions remain about why it took so long.

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