Literature

  • The self-diagnosis debate

    In my last column, I wrote about the relief I experienced after receiving my adult autism diagnosis from a psychologist.

  • Speculating Manitoba, and beyond

    Literary fiction has been forever in conflict with its sibling and nemesis: genre fiction. In general, the literary world sees literary fiction as “highbrow” works that cannot be defined by their relationship to any specific genre.

  • Help Wanted

    Shortly after the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic, policies like the Canada Emergency Response Benefit (CERB) were implemented to address the high levels of unemployment and encourage workers to stay home. Since then, the discourse on economic policy in Canada has continuously shifted.

  • Arts briefs

    Winnipeg Comiccon is here!// Played the Fool releasing new single// Get spooked at Six Pines// Postmodern Jukebox at the Burton Cummings Theatre// Manitoba Music x Coup de coeur francophone// Kímmapiiyipitssini: The Meaning of Empathy opening in Canadian theatres

  • A spirited conversation

    It’s a Winnipeg tradition that on the first Friday of the month, art enthusiasts of all stripes gather in the historic Exchange District to pop into warehouse studios, drink merlot from plastic chalices and converse about local artworks. Though the COVID-19 pandemic has disrupted First Fridays in the Exchange, local art-markers continue to find ways to (virtually) bring the joy of art to the public.

  • To be or not to be? That is (still) the question

    William Shakespeare might have written plays during the 16th century, but the pillars of his stories prevail in the modern world. Two virtual classes, presented by theatre company Shakespeare in the Ruins (SIR) and McNally Robinson Booksellers, aim to shed light on his enduring influence.

  • The Worst Kind of Time Travel

    If the past few years have taught me anything, it’s that we’re still fighting many of the battles I thought had been won long ago.

  • Reading the TRC Calls to Action

    The National Day for Truth and Reconciliation that took place only a few weeks ago gave all Canadians the opportunity to learn about and engage with Indigenous experiences and stories.  There were both in-person and virtual events in Winnipeg that offered avenues for learning and listening, including powwows, sacred fires, walks, workshops and a youth and elder tea.

  • Winnipeg Comiccon showcases fandoms

    Comiccon, the popular convention known for gathering comic book fans, cosplayers and pop-culture store owners, is heading to Winnipeg for the first time, running at the RBC Convention Centre from Oct. 29 to 31.

  • What happened to the 99 per cent?

    It’s Oct. 15, 2011. The Arab Spring has been in progress for 10 months, Occupy Wall Street protests have been going on for just over a month and, in Winnipeg, the first Occupy event is taking place: the Occupy Winnipeg march, swiftly followed by the construction of the Occupy Winnipeg camp.

  • PROFile: Solving problems

    For Terry Visentin – professor for the University of Winnipeg’s (U of W) Department of Mathematics and Statistics – problem solving is one of the most engaging aspects of mathematics.

  • ‘This city is a car city’

    During the first waves of the COVID-19 pandemic, many people were required to work and study from home. As fewer people travelled into the downtown core to go to the office or classes, the streets were fairly quiet, and parking was much easier to find.

  • Manitoba legislature to have land acknowledgement

    On Sept. 16, interim Premier Kelvin Goertzen announced the formation of a working group to develop “recommendation for an Indigenous land acknowledgment to be used in the Manitoba Legislature,” according to a Progressive Conservative Caucus press release.

  • City briefs

    New labs go live// Watching the vote on Bill 207// Public cannabis consumption cancelled// Speakers on supporting the unsheltered// Riley Lecture on the Sixties Scoop// Congratulations, graduates!

  • Arts briefs

    Reel Pride 2021// Submit your docs// An evening with Colin Smith// Jade Turner album release// MCO presents Raine Hamilton// Museum music minutes at Dalnavert

  • Culinary novel shakes off cultural stereotypes

    Playwright and social-media influencer Primrose Madayag Knazan had the opportunity to fulfill a childhood dream when Great Plains Publications asked her to write her first book.

  • ‘Conversations about stigma’ are all talk

    In mid-September, Winnipeg-born singer-songwriter Chantal Kreviazuk spoke to multiple media outlets about “ending the stigma around talking about mental health.” As Kreviazuk told CTV News Winnipeg, “I’ve always believed we’re only as strong as the person who’s having the most challenging time in our immediate family, in our community.

  • Re-Indigenizing Treaty 1 and beyond

    A new initiative is being brought to life by University of Winnipeg (U of W) art history professor Dr. Julie Nagam. Nagam is working alongside an international team of BIPOC artists and researchers, who are passionate about re-Indigenizing urban centres and universities through public art and technology.

  • Institutionalized racism and academic misconduct

    In many cases, academic misconduct is something professors discuss on the first day of classes – but individual instances of academic dishonesty aren’t often spoken about by the greater campus community.

  • Gardens at the leaf now in bloom

    The Gardens at The Leaf, a “place where nature and culture unite,” opened this summer at Assiniboine Park. This outdoor attraction is part of the final phase of Assiniboine Park’s 2009 redevelopment plan. This nearly 30-acre greenspace comprises six distinct exhibits.

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