Rebecca Driedger

Arts and culture reporter  

  • Back at it again

    After two years of sitting on the edge of their seats, waiting to hear whether or not they could be hosted in person, festivals all over Winnipeg will finally return.

  • Social diagnosis

    Since TikTok’s rise in popularity, many have applauded the algorithm that feeds viewers content tailored to their interests. With more popularity comes more content covering different topics and specialists who have found a space to educate others, including through videos talking about mental health.

  • New musical seeks audience feedback

    Many theatrical groups were hard at work during the COVID-19 pandemic, preparing performances to show off once venues reopened.

    Walk&Talk Theatre Company went a little further by starting a pre-pandemic project, taking a break from it, then bringing it back to life.

  • Local performers raise funds for Ukraine

    Russia’s brutal and unprovoked invasion of Ukraine has left some Winnipeg residents scared, horrified and searching for answers about whether or not their family members and friends are safe.

    Many businesses and organizations have raised funds or collected items to send over to Ukraine, and some have more directly joined the fight.

  • Venues adapt to relaxed restrictions

    When the Manitoba government announced that COVID-19 restrictions would be slowly lifted, it gave entertainment venues a lot to consider.

  • How long is too long?

    According to a report from the Canadian Institute for Health Information (CIHI) published in May of 2021, half of Canadians wait up to a month for ongoing counselling services, while one in 10 Canadians may wait more than four months.

  • Getting active for a good cause

    Virtual 5Ks and other races have become increasingly popular during the COVID-19 pandemic. The ability for runners to socially distance, choose their own locations and participate at their own pace have made them an attractive option for beginners and seasoned runners alike.

  • Learning to work with the darkness

    Last year, the Village Conservatory for Music Theatre held a virtual exhibition titled Inhibition Exhibition to showcase 14 original pieces. The works were a mixture of original songs, poems, dances and short plays, created with the help of some of Winnipeg’s top arts professionals.

  • Virtual field trips for Black History Month

    What was first identified as Black History Week in the early 1970s was expanded to what Canadians now celebrate as Black History Month in 1976. To commemorate this, the Manitoba Museum is offering a series of virtual field trips for participants to learn about Black history in Canada.

  • Empowering children through storytelling

    Public speaker, community organizer and writer – is there anything Michael Redhead Champagne can’t do? After penning several articles, books and reports, he can now add “children’s book author” to his long list of accomplishments.

  • Here’s to never growing up

    When Avril Lavigne announced her first tour in 10 years, the internet went wild – especially those who eagerly waited to buy tickets for her upcoming Winnipeg show on May 17 at the Canada Life Centre.

  • Jazz Winnipeg hosts virtual summit

    Jazz Winnipeg and the University of Manitoba’s (U of M) Desautels Faculty of Music have been hard at work planning the Canadian Jazz Summit.

  • Mosaic Award invests in emerging film voices

    Funds can be the most significant stepping stone for a filmmaker’s career, so awards are highly sought after. There are several awards and funds available for filmmakers in Winnipeg, and the winner of the Mosaic award from Winnipeg Film Group was just announced.

  • Environmental crisis the foundation of new theatrical works

    Theatre has been a medium for change for centuries. Theatre Projects Manitoba (TPM) is contributing to that history with their new show Climate & Main, which will bring attention to climate-related issues.

  • The curtains are up, and there’s no place to hide

    For many, post-secondary education is a pivotal time in one’s life – a time to make and learn from mistakes without fear of jeopardizing a career.

  • PTE commissions portraits from young winnipeg artist

    Some artists take years to specialize in their field. Others pick up a pencil or a paintbrush and instantly feel a connection. Fourteen-year-old Essey Habtu has only been painting for the last couple of years but has already started to make a name for himself in Winnipeg’s arts scene.

  • Favourite local grassroots group

    1. Winnipeg Police Cause Harm
    2. Mutual Aid Society (MAS)
    3. Bear Clan Patrol

  • Favourite film by a local filmmaker

    1. Strong Son by Ian Bawa
    2. Ste. Anne by Rhayne Vermette
    3. PG: Psycho Goreman by Steven Kostanski

  • Favourite local activist

    1. Mahlet Cuff (Justice 4 Black Lives)
    2. Omar Kinnarath (FF1)
    3. Kayla Fernandes (Vagina Witchcraft)

  • History revamped

    Many Canadian cities have historical buildings modelled after European architecture. But many of those buildings have been torn down to make room for parking lots, residential multiplexes and a variety of other businesses.

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