Isabella Soares

Arts and culture reporter  

  • Social media cultivates musical connections

    While established artists benefited from record-breaking streams and online concerts during the COVID-19 pandemic outbreaks, budding musicians had to find ways to reinvent themselves.

  • Lights, camera, action

    With the COVID-19 pandemic making it hard for local filmmakers to exhibit their work, the Winnipeg Film Group (WFG) decided to share the backlog of Winnipeg-based productions through their members’ screenings. The first screening took place on March 19, and the following two will happen on April 2 and 22.

  • Radio is alive with a podcast flare

    Although there has been a shift from the conventional format of short talking segments in between songs, radio hosts say working behind the mic is even more exciting nowadays with the rise of social media and the podcast era.

  • A coming-of-age tale in a foreign land

    After travelling to more than 50 countries, local author Nancy Chislett was inspired to write her first novel, which is set in Nairobi, Kenya. Bombing the Moon tells the story of 24-year-old Devin Rush, whose grandfather gives him a one-way ticket to Nairobi, where Devin hopes to flee from family pressure and determine his goals for the future.

  • ‘Cinematic, nostalgic and personal’

    Navigating relationships is rarely easy. Whether starting something new or reminiscing on the good old days, Winnipeg singer-songwriter Cassidy Mann translated her own experiences into her debut EP, If It’s Not Forever, which comes out on April 1.

  • No fuss, just(e) slam

    For writers seeking an opportunity to share their poetry beyond their journals, Just(e) Slam secures an attentive audience.

    Organized by Centre culturel franco-manitobain, Alliance Française du Manitoba and La Maison Gabrielle-Roy, Just(e) Slam is a monthly event for professional and amateur writers to recite their own poems.

  • A modern-day twist on a classic

    If the literary classic To Kill A Mockingbird were adapted to reflect the current reality, what would the story look like? The answer to this question lies in Calpurnia, a new Royal Manitoba Theatre Centre (Royal MTC) production premiering on March 24.

  • RWB dancer returns for The Sleeping Beauty

    To live life to the fullest is to focus on your passions as if there were no tomorrow. After receiving a brain cancer diagnosis in 2013, dancer and former Broadway performer Catherine Wreford Ledlow decided to return to Winnipeg and take a second shot at dance.

  • Promoting music with (real) love

    For emerging and established artists, getting the word out about upcoming gigs is the secret ingredient for a great show. Real Love Winnipeg recognized this need and now works to build community between music lovers and makers.

  • Glam time is a superpower

    Applying foundation and blending eyeshadow with precision isn’t as easy as it seems. Makeup artistry’s value is often overlooked, but according to Winnipeg freelancers, this trade is worthy of recognition and respect

  • Rocking out of loneliness

    From Avril Lavigne’s comeback to Machine Gun Kelly’s emo shift after years in the rap scene, it’s clear that pop punk is back on trend. But it isn’t the only rock sub-genre making a comeback.

  • ‘There must be something (better) out there’

    It doesn’t come as a surprise that the streaming era has drastically affected artists with its significantly low pay per stream and its impact on international visibility.

  • Literacy campaign sheds light on Black History

    The month of February is dedicated to recognizing Black history, as well as promoting readership through I Love to Read Month. When taking both subject matters into account, storytelling and literature are crucial resources to understanding Black history and deconstructing racism. Aware of this, Black History Manitoba (BHM) offers various resources to help expose the community to Black history, which is often overlooked in school textbooks.

  • Recovering through art

    Acknowledging mental-health struggles is often the first step toward treatment. The second is finding ways to cope with these challenges. For creative types, art therapy is a valuable outlet to express thoughts and nurture a balanced lifestyle.

  • Getting the show on the road

    Cancelling shows, closing down venues, rescheduling events. This cycle has haunted music makers and admirers for the past two years, but things are starting to look up for Alexa Dirks, better known as Winnipeg indie-pop artist Begonia.

  • Love beyond borders

    Globalization isn’t a new phenomenon. With increasing internet connectivity and opportunities to venture abroad, people from different countries are bonding over a love immune to culture shock – at least to a certain extent.

  • Inclusive Productions

    Good + Plenty WPG was founded in January 2020 as a vehicle to promote local music and live events by women, non-binary and trans artists. With a full programming schedule planned, mass cancellations led the creative team to rethink their plans to connect with the music community through a recently launched Producer’s Club and a corresponding podcast.

  • Pathways to a digital legacy

    The new year started well for Academy Award-winning singer-songwriter, Indigenous activist and digital artist Buffy Sainte-Marie. In addition to her new deal with Cameron Strang’s Howe Sound Publishing and a documentary being produced by White Pine Pictures, Sainte-Marie is getting the recognition she deserves for her lasting impact in the Canadian arts and culture scene through an exhibition at Urban Shaman Gallery in Winnipeg.

  • Travelling was necessary for me

    This autumn, with COVID-19 cases at a steady low and a permanent residency card in hand, I decided to visit family members and my long-time boyfriend in São Paulo, Brazil. The holiday break seemed like an incredible opportunity to book a trip to my home country. 

  • Languages speak louder than barriers

    Communication is key to fostering relationships, establishing professional connections and for simple tasks like asking for proper directions to a destination. Learning a new language has become a necessity for many people living abroad, as well as an important means of expression for families with international backgrounds.

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