News Briefs

Women’s March Winnipeg

Women’s March Canada is hosting Women’s March Winnipeg on Saturday, Jan. 20. The march is meant as a way to gather in peaceful solidarity with people who identify as women and human rights groups across the world to show that progress made in 2017 isn’t enough. The march will start at Winnipeg City Hall at 11 a.m. and will run until around 1 p.m.

Challenging white supremacy on campus

The Critical Race Network and the University of Winnipeg Students’ Association are hosting an event on Wednesday, Jan. 24 to talk about challenging white supremacy on campus. The event will take place at the Bulman Student Centre at the University of Winnipeg. There will be a BIPOC gathering and discussion at 6 p.m. Allies are welcome to join at 7 p.m.

PACE Cultural Night

All are invited to the seventh annual Cultural Night produced by the student committee of University of Winnipeg's Professional, Applied, and Continuing Education (PACE). The event takes place from 6:30 to 10:30 p.m. at the Winnipeg Art Gallery. There will be dance performances and a fashion show. Tickets can be bought through eventbrite.ca.

Paint Nite

The University of Winnipeg will be hosting its first Paint Nite. It will take place in the University Club, fourth floor Wesley Hall on Thursday Jan. 25 from 5 to 8 p.m. It costs $45 with $15 going towards the UWinnipeg Opportunity Fund.
To buy tickets, and for more information,
visit paintnite.com.

Delayed sentences

The sentencing for the killer of Cooper Nemeth was delayed on Monday, Jan. 14 because of the number of victims wanting to speak about how his death affected them. They will be receiving a total of 96 victim impact statements, something the judge says he and other judges have never seen. There will now be a hearing next Monday to debate the admissibility of each victim impact statement.

Cut to grant program

Manitoba Riding for the Disabled Association, a not-for-profit run out of Oakbluff, is worried their program is in jeopardy due to a provincial grant cut. Their program gives kids with autism, cerebral palsy, Down syndrome and other conditions therapeutic horseback riding lessons. They applied for a $15,000 grant through Manitoba Community Services Council and are worried they won’t see it come through.

Published in Volume 72, Number 14 of The Uniter (January 18, 2018)

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