Let your taste buds say, ‘Olé!’

Segovia offers a sumptuous taste of Spain

  • The food menu at Segovia on Stradbrook Avenue offers a unique array of small plates meant for sharing, including bar snacks, meat and cheese plates, tapas and desserts. – Antoinette Dycksman

Segovia Tapas Bar & Restaurant
484 Stradbrook Ave.


Located just off Osborne Street on Stradbrook Avenue, Segovia, Winnipeg’s newest tapas bar, introduces some much-needed Spanish flair into Winnipeg’s dining scene.

Chef Adam Donnely, a graduate of Red River College’s culinary arts program and Spanish food enthusiast, named the restaurant after a small village he visited during his six-week trip to Spain where he immersed himself in the country’s culinary culture.

The intimate, classy interior of the restaurant offers diners a choice of two distinct eating environments. The chic, silver-toned dining room has a sophisticated vibe, while the chunky wooden tables and open kitchen in the lounge provide a more casual ambience and a view of the chefs at work.

The food menu offers a unique array of small plates meant for sharing, including bar snacks, meat and cheese plates, tapas and desserts. While some of the exotic ingredients may be unfamiliar to the average Winnipeg diner, the knowledgeable servers are happy to clear up any confusion and describe the dishes in detail.

The bar snacks menu ranges in price from $3.50 to $8 and boasts an array of traditional Spanish nibbles, including marcona almonds, chorizo sausage and tortilla.

The server-recommended patatas bravas, a small heap of hot, thick-cut potato chips drizzled sparingly with garlic aioli and creamy tomato bravas sauce, were a delectably salty starter.

Segovia, Winnipeg’s newest tapas bar, introduces some much-needed Spanish flair into Winnipeg’s dining scene.

The charcuterie (cured meats) and cheese menu features various platters of Spanish meats, cheeses and fruits. The Manchego cheese trio showcased three varieties of Spain’s most beloved cheese and came served on a rustic wooden slab with sliced apple and quince preserves, which provided a sweet contrast to the sharp tang of the cheeses. The accompanying selection of house-made crackers added a unique touch.

A number of small, intricately exotic main dishes that incorporate some of Spain’s finest ingredients are featured on the tapas menu, with plates ranging from $8 to $19.

The roasted quail wings came served on a bed of grilled radicchio and Serrano ham, and were topped with walnuts and cubes of baked pear. While the wings were rather petite, the meat they did yield was succulent, though the flavour was overpowered by the vinegar-saturated radicchio.

A lengthy wine menu suggests pairings with specific menu items, and five varieties of sherry are available for diners looking to complete the authentic Spanish culinary experience.

After an evening of grazing one will definitely have room for dessert.

The cinnamon churros, served with a hot chocolate-orange sauce for dunking, are a must. A warm and slightly doughy inside contrasted marvellously with the delicate crunch of the sugar-coated outer layer.

Overall, Segovia offers a stimulating culinary experience allowing diners to sample a variety of different dishes rather than gorging on large portions of a single dish.

A refreshing change from familiar tastes, Segovia is the perfect place for a palate that needs a little perking up.

Published in Volume 64, Number 19 of The Uniter (February 11, 2010)

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