Identity

  • My identity does not need your approval

    Most days, I don’t even know who I am. Similar to the way that people sometimes Google themselves, I often review my Facebook timeline. Who am I? What qualities do I present? Are my political memes dank enough?

  • Changes in social change

    From youth organizing to civil rights movements to the evolving social discourse, a lot has changed for people engaging in activism, community work and advocacy in Winnipeg during the past decade.

  • Flipping the script

    Writers have a talent for tapping into imagination, and despite their chosen genre, skillfully put pen to paper (or fingers to keyboard) to create an immersive reading experience. Though their talents are displayed on each page, their background and journey into the literary world are often reserved for memoirs.

  • Promoting strength to prevent suicides

    The World Indigenous Suicide Prevention Conference (WISPC) is coming to Winnipeg. Originally scheduled for August, in light of COVID-19, the conference will be postponed until a later date.

  • Winnipeg’s Artists of Colour

    Many of Winnipeg’s marginalized artists are multitalented people who fall into a wide spectrum of racial categories. Their stories need to be heard, their accomplishments deserve celebration and more work needs to be done to create a more inclusive and truly diverse space.

  • Kultivation cultivates Filipino culture

    After a successful – but COVID-19 interrupted – popup in the Garden City Shopping Centre, Kultivation Festival, which celebrates the contemporary art of Filipino people in Winnipeg, will take place in the Exchange District in June.

  • Media skewing Wet’suwet’en

    “Wet’suwet’en, what do you think about the protesting?” I was asked, the only Indigenous person at a Leap Year fire.

  • Halfway to somewhere

    The idea of walking a mile in someone else’s shoes is a common metaphor for how people should empathize with one another. I see this show up in little ways in my everyday conversations. When a friend tells me something they’re struggling with, I find myself responding with a story of a situation I’ve been in that is comparable in order to identify with their struggle.

  • M(étis)anitoba 150

    The first two months of the new decade have seen a slew of initiatives branded with the Manitoba 150 logo. 

  • The true craic of St. Patrick’s Day

    Decorations, parades and even beer will soon be green, as Winnipeggers celebrate St. Patrick’s Day on March 17.

  • Arts briefs

    Garland Party! // Transcendent // Craftivism at MAWA // Anthony OKS album release // Sounds of Curtains (now destroyed) // First Fridays - Women, Art & Identity 

  • A conversation with Shoog McDaniel

    Photographic artist and fat liberation activist Shoog McDaniel will give a talk at the West End Cultural Centre (WECC) on March 10 as part of the Uniter Speaker Series. The talk will be hosted by comedian and local television personality Issa Kixen. 

  • A queer, colourful animal pad

    Karen Sharma is an organizer with QPOC Winnipeg who does the important work of creating safe spaces for 2SQTBIPOC.

  • Callouts are the symptom, not the problem

    It’s 2020, and certain bloggers and cultural commentators have become obsessed with the question of whether “callout culture” has gone too far. 

  • Proudly bipolar

    You may have plenty of images in your head already after reading that headline. When you think about bipolar disorder, what first comes to mind? Let me guess: probably someone with two personalities, right?

  • Feeding diaspora

    Food is a powerful storyteller, so rich and multi-sensory that the mere image of it brings potent memories and associations. Many diasporic artists work with food iconography and names, because it is an accessible way to communicate cultural identity, lineage, home and double-meanings.

  • Filmmaking ain’t for everybody

    Spike Lee, Ava DuVernay and Ryan Coogler are successful Black directors, and their journeys can point to an idealistic future where all directors, regardless of race and gender, can have fruitful careers.

  • Halfway to somewhere

    For the past year, I’ve been working on an academic research project in which I interview individuals from the trans community who belong to generations before me.

  • Feeding Diaspora

    I first became enthralled with the concept of leaving traces in public space when Chilean-Canadian ceramics artist Monica Martinez told me about her time in art school.

  • This master cannot truly be followed

    William Shakespeare is the final focus of the Master Playwright Festival.
     

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